top tips, Travel inspiration, Uncategorized

19 Must visit destinations post coronavirus

I really thought I was handling this lock down situation quite well.  I’m reading more, eating and sleeping well. I’m even spending quality time with my husband and genuinely quite enjoying a slower pace. That was until my calendar pinged with a reminder that online check-in was open for my now-cancelled trip to Poland. I suddenly realised how much I have missed travel. Not just weekends away and the giddy excitement of long-haul trips but also travelling around the UK visiting my family. With wanderlust daydreaming the best we can hope for at the moment. Here are 21 fabulous destinations that should be on your list when things get back to normal.

1. Azerbaijan: Baku

Azerbaijan first came to my attention in 2011 after a historic win in the national institution that is, the Eurovision Song Contest (A guilty pleasure!). Celebrations from the capital brought Baku into the spotlight. Baku is a gorgeous tapestry of old and new. Skyscrapers rub shoulders with ancient architecture providing a juxtaposing backdrop for a city break with a difference.

Baku offers travellers excellent value for money and a host of incredible experiences. Notable sights include the Old City, The Maiden Tower and my personal favourite Yanar Dag or the ‘burning mountain.’ Something about this untamed natural fire burning for millennia at the base of the mountains outside Baku really appeals to my sense of adventure. Flames rip through the landscape and dance through the sky feasting on the natural gas escaping from the ground below.  A true natural spectacle.

If you’re looking for a luxurious base whilst in Baku, I would recommend the Fairmont Baku, Flame Towers. A 5* hotel situated on the Absheron Peninsula, with its sumptuous city and sea views, what more could you want?

2. Canada: Yukon

A true wilderness. Many travellers today are seeking a more remote and disconnected travel experience. Something a little more in tune with the natural environment. If this sentiment rings true in your heart then small Canadian territory of Yukon might be everything you’re looking for.

Yukon is Canada’s most westerly territory. Sharing a border with Alaska, Yukon has an Arctic coastline with a wild tundra climate. If you’ve ever fantasised about the aurora, midnight sun and husky sledging through wide snow-covered expanses then move over Norway!

But, the Yukon is so much more than a giant winter sports adventure playground. Glorious wildlife from arctic foxes to elk and bison call the Yukon home and can be spotted on hiking trails and making the most of this remarkable natural environment. The Yukon also holds a rich depth of culture of the territories First Nations. With almost a quarter of all Yukoners having Aboriginal ancestry First National history, culture and traditions are a celebrated part of Yukon life today.

3. Canada: Newfoundland & Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is Canada’s most easterly province. Sitting in the frigid Atlantic Ocean is the island of Newfoundland and section of mainland Labrador. This spectacular province should be topping your list if you’re seeking close encounters of the aquatic kind. The waters surrounding Newfoundland Labrador is prime whale-watching territory. With the world’s largest population of humpback whales returning each year to feed on the superior fish stocks, you are guaranteed an awe-inspiring experience with these majestic mammals.

Newfoundland and Labrador aren’t just known for its phenomenal wildlife, the hospitality and friendliness of locals are well renowned. Coupled with world-class seafood and the infamous East Coast hiking trail, Newfoundland Labrador has plenty to offer any type of traveler.

4. Georgia

Georgia is stunning, yet despite being a clear European gem it attracts a relatively limited number of tourists. According to the World Tourism Organisation Georgia welcomed only around 7,000 tourists in 2018.

Allegedly Georgia is the birthplace of wine. But, if fabulous vino and food aren’t enough to get you booking your ticket then Georgia plays host to a spectacular landscape. Sweeping vineyards, luscious green valleys, stone carpeted beaches, snow-capped mountains, and that’s just the scenery.

Georgia has a brilliant depth of history, culture and architecture, evident in the vibrant capital city of Tbilisi.

My recommendation is Moxy Tbilisi. This cool quirky hotel is the perfect spot for a weekend getaway. https://www.marriott.co.uk/hotels/travel/tbsox-moxy-tbilisi/

5. Germany: Passau

Tucked away in the heart of Europe, sitting on the German Austrian border sits the town of Passau. Due to its location at a point where three rivers merge Passau is also known as The Three Rivers City. This uniquely located city with its picturesque landscapes, Italian style architecture and centuries of history makes this Bavarian Venice a hugely underrated European destination.

For a perfect riverside stay, I would recommend The Hotel Residenz, an imposing salmon coloured icon right on the banks of the Danube. Sitting atop the foundations of a four-hundred-year-old merchant house, the hotel provides the ideal balance between historic restoration and contemporary luxury. https://www.residenz-passau.de/index.php/en/

6. Italy: Florence

Florence has been sat on my travel wish list for years! After reading Dan Brown’s Inferno his vivid imagery has kept my desire to visit this Italian gem alive.

Whether you’re a history, art, food or architecture aficionado Florence has something for every type of traveller. As the birthplace of the Renaissance, every street, gallery and piazza have an abundance of artistic and architectural treasures to immerse yourself in.

Florence is the perfect spot for a long romantic weekend getaway. Unlike other, popular city breaks like Rome or Paris, Florence has a small-town charm and a slower pace. I can imagine nothing better than strolling down cosy backstreets, leisurely gorging on gelato.

I would recommend booking a room at the Art Hotel Villa Agape. Surrounded by an eight-hectare park of olive and cypress trees this is an idyllic place to retreat to after a long day exploring the city.

7. Japan: Hokkaido

Japan has been firmly etched onto my bucket list for forever (hence why I’m recommending two incredible destinations). Hokkaido is Japan’s most northerly island and has been somewhat overlooked by travellers who often opt for the well-known cities of Tokyo, Kyoto or Osaka.

Hokkaido is a winter paradise. Hot springs, thrilling skiing and the glorious Ice Waterfall festival just to name a few must-do items.

To take in everything this Japanese Island has to offer I would recommend a tour from North to South. For some inspiration check out this sensational  twelve-day itinerary https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2400_hokkaido_winter.html

8. Japan:  Kyushu

Japan is a land of contrast and while the island of Hokkaido is a winter nirvana, Kyushu is a temperate volcanic wonderworld.

Japan’s most southerly island is best known for its active volcanos, hot springs and the destruction of Nagasaki in 1945. With such a vast range of things to do and see any traveller should make a beeline for this less explored island.

Kyushu is the optimal location for getting up close and personal with live volcanos then unwinding on the beach with a cocktail. In my mind, all adventures to Kyushu should finish on Tomori beach.

9. Jordan: Intrepid Tour

If you’ve ever seen Raiders of the Lost Ark then you will have marvelled at the lost city of Petra. An entire city complex carved into the distinctive russet Jordanian rock. Whilst the 2,000-year-old city of Petra should rightfully be on your list, Jordan has more to offer the savvy traveller. Jordan is littered with incredibly well preserved ancient monuments. Remote desert camps of the nomadic Bedouin and coral laden shores. Jordan has so much to offer than simply the lost city.

To experience all this beautiful country has to offer, I would recommend starting your journey with Intrepid Travel’s Jordan Discovery trip. This luxury group tour could be the perfect starting point to ignite your passion for travel in the Middle East.

https://www.intrepidtravel.com/uk/jordan/jordan-discovery-125297

10.  Kyrgyzstan

I’m pretty sure I have a thing for mountains, and there is no more majestic display of dramatic craggy peaks than in Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyzstan is a historic point on the Silk Road where ancient peoples from all parts of the globe would meet to trade.

A stark contrast to the expansive mountain ranges which cut across the sky is the vast summer pastures dotted with yurts of the nomadic shepherds. Kyrgyzstan offers a unique and wild travel experience in the heart of central Asia. True adventure seekers will feel as though they are the only travellers to hike the mountain paths and delight in this Asian wonder.

For a fully immersive central Asian experience, I would recommend the Central Asia Explorer Trip with Intrepid Travel https://www.intrepidtravel.com/uk/uzbekistan/central-asia-explorer-126379

11.Macedonia

It wasn’t until I was on a boat trip in Croatia late last year that Macedonia firmly planted itself on my must-visit list. After chatting with our fellow travellers that day, they couldn’t have given Macedonia a harder sell for those who enjoy a more active type of holiday. White water rafting, unpopulated hiking trails, glorious mountains and glittering waterways are just a slice of what’s on offer.

Even if an outdoor adventure trip isn’t for you, Macedonia offers a rich history with Ottoman and Soviet influences. The capital Skopje and a UNESCO World Heritage site at Ohrid are particular highlights. 

12. Mexico 

Whilst tourists have been flocking to Mexico’s beach resorts for many years, Mexico is harbouring an incredible travel opportunity. The El Chepe train. Covering six hundred and fifty kilometres the El Chepe train works its way through the Copper Canyon from Los Mochis to Chihuahua. Significant attractions along the line include awe-inspiring scenery, particularly when travelling towards Los Mochis.   

There are a number of beautiful tourist stops along the route, the most significant of which is the town of Divisadero. Upon arrival in Divisadero, you’ll want to have your camera at the ready for the panoramic views over the Copper Canyon. Four times the size of the USA’s Grand Canyon, the Copper Canyon is a true natural spectacle.  

https://www.visitcoppercanyon.com/visit-copper-canyon-train/#schedules

13. Norway: Lofoten Islands

Having made two trips to Norway previously, there is something about this Scandi beauty that has wormed its way into my heart. Norway’s Lofoten Islands is a rugged archipelago suspended above the Arctic Circle.  

Norway is renowned for its incredible mountainous scenery and deep placid fjords. But, the Lofoten Islands push this to a whole new level. For the adventure traveller, there is no more unique place than the Lofoten Islands to hike up soaring peaks, pitch your tent and watch that midnight sun.

My recommendation for a perfect Lofoten base is Hattvika Lodge. https://www.hattvikalodge.no/accomondation

14. Namibia

The beauty of Africa’s skeleton coast is not a new travel destination, but Namibia’s growing popularly shouldn’t put you off. We’ve all seen the images of burnt ochre sands with blackened emaciated trees silhouetted against the desert. But, what’s behind this stunning collision of earth, sky and sea?

Namibia is one of the safest African countries and one of the most favourable places for a family safari. In addition to dramatic game drives Namibia offers a host of other activities. Hot air ballooning, sand dune skiing or hiking in the Fish River Canyon are just a few of your options.

15. Portugal: Sintra

Portugal’s Algarve is a synonymous holiday destination with the British public but, take a journey into the pine swathed hills to discover the town of Sintra.

Easily accessible from Lisbon, Sintra is a UNESCO World Heritage site. With palaces galore, miles and miles of charming views and exquisite Moorish architecture Sintra is quite possible the perfect day trip.

If you do want to extend your visit to Sintra then you’ll need to book in advance as accommodation books up fast. My top pick for a luxurious stay in Sintra is the Penha Longa Resort. http://www.penhalonga.com/en/

16. Singapore

I’ve never spoken to anyone who had a bad word to say about Singapore. The clean, friendly, world-class food and unparalleled hospitality this city-state is the ideal backdrop for any visit to the far east.

Singapore has an incredible mix of colonial grandeur, sky-scraping luxury, innovative architecture and is a brilliant stop gap for further travels to Malaysia, Indonesia, The Philippines or Thailand.

If you’re looking to break up a long-haul trip then you can’t go wrong with a few days in Singapore. Take a walk through the opulent and ornate botanical gardens. Sip afternoon tea at the world-famous Raffles. Indulge in sundowners on top of the world and be dazzled by the evening light show in the bay. A short layover in Singapore could provide just the right amount of glitz and excitement on a long-haul journey.

17. Sumatra

At the start of 2020, I started planning an epic trip to the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Whilst other islands on the Indonesian archipelago like, Bali and Java are fabulous holiday destinations. I’ve been feeling the need for something a little wilder and a path less trodden.

Sumatra is the largest of the Indonesian islands. Sweeping lustrous tropical terrain, active volcanos, orangutan strongholds and lakeside tranquillity, Sumatra might just be the most exquisite cocktail of adventure and holiday chill.

As with many locations off the main tourist thoroughfare, top-end luxurious accommodation isn’t always available. I think a trip like is all about fully immersing your self in the environment and really sinking a little deeper into the culture of this beautiful island.

18. Turkmenistan

Every now and then I am completely captivated by an idea, most recently it has been to discover the old cities of the Silk Road. Turkmenistan is located in central Asia, bordered by the Caspian Sea, Iran, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Afghanistan. If you are a traveler looking for a destination off the beaten path then Turkmenistan could be your ideal location. Ancient cities, deserts, mountains and even the infamous door to hell Turkmenistan has something for all types of traveler. If you are looking for the ultimate remote travel experience Turkmenistan might just be worth it.

19. Vanuatu

If it’s the island life you’re after then look no further than the South Pacific jewel that is Vanuatu. Pristine alabaster sandy beaches, blissfully blue sea, world-class diving and volcano trekking. Vanuatu has the optimal balance of blissful holiday retreat and ultimate travel experience.

For superior relaxation and island vibes, I recommend Tamanu on the Beach. A private peaceful 5* resort and spa would be the perfect couples’ getaway or honeymoon destination.

I hope these beautiful destinations have given you some travel inspiration. I’d love to know where you plan to visit when travel is unrestricted and coronavirus is confined to the archives of 2020.

Happy travels

Jess

Germany, mini break, top tips, Uncategorized, weekend break

Munich: A quick guide to 3 days in the Bavarian capital

When we first set out to book a long weekend German jolly, Berlin was a firm front runner. Yet, after some swift price comparison and a little research, Munich came out on top. Tickets booked, and excursions planned we had a May bank holiday break to get excited about.

Getting to Munich

There are a variety of ways to get to Munich, if you’re flying from the UK, flights regularly operate with direct flights from most UK airports. There are options to change in Frankfurt, so breaking up your trip with a few days taking in the sights of another German gem is definitely an option. The average flight time direct to Munich is one hour and ten minutes.

If you feel like taking a more laid-back approach to arrival in Munich, there is a direct train from Berlin. The journey is around four hours and allows you to take in the beautiful German countryside. If your starting point is another European city, the rail links to Munich are excellent as it sits on a European mainline serviced by high-speed trains.

Where to Stay

Munich isn’t a small town so choose your hotel wisely if you want easy access around the city. That being said, the transports links in the city are excellent. As has proved easy, cost-effective and efficient we booked our hotel as part of the British Airways Hotel and flight deal. This is great service allowing you to specify star rating, dates and price for your accommodation. We opted for the 4* Hilton Munich City. The hotel is a twenty-minute walk to Marienplatz at the heart of the old town and a fifteen-minute walk to the Ostbahnhof. The location was perfect for city exploring and quick links to the airport.

Our room was a standard double but very comfortable, it was clean and bright and the staff couldn’t have been more helpful during our stay.

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Where to eat

Bavarian cuisine is meat and potato heavy, luckily, I’m a big fan of both and when you throw gravy into the mix any dish becomes a winner.

Haxenbauer im Scholastikahaus

If its meat perfection you’re after then you need to eat here. I promise the smell from the street alone will be enough to get you through the door. Upon entry, you are greeted by 24 hours marinated and grilled pork knuckle turning on a spit by the window. The meat melts on your plate and combined with creamy mash, sauerkraut, crispy onions and thick gravy, this meal is everything you could wish for. Washed down with yet more beer Haxenbauer became an instant hit, so much so we returned for a second night.

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Viktualienmarkt Food Market

This well-known grab and go food market is the ideal spot for lunch or a late afternoon pick me up. Smells, sounds, and the incessant chatter of locals and tourists make this vibrant market worth a wander before settling down to eat. Whether it is artisan coffee, crispy pretzels, cold cuts or yet more beer the Viktualienmarkt has something for everyone.

Café Luitpold

Old school charm. If you are seeking, an elegant afternoon caffeinated kick back then I recommend Café Luitpold. This historic coffee house opened in 1888 and soon became a Munich institution. With writers, creatives and artists like Kandinsky historic regulars it’s hard not to feel a little bit glamorous whilst sipping your beverage in fabulously luxurious grandeur.

What to do

Drink Beer

So, I’m going to class beer as a culinary experience and a food group here. I mean you can’t visit Munich without sampling their world-famous wheaty, hoppy, amber magic. It is no surprise that Munich plays host to the world’s largest beer festival, Oktoberfest. Our trip didn’t coincide with Oktoberfest, but that didn’t mean we couldn’t grab a stein and see what all the fuss is about.

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The Hofbräuhaus is the mecca for beer lovers in Munich. However, we didn’t time our visit particularly well. Every tourist, stag party and beer lover seemed to have descended on the beer hall at the same as we did.  Unperturbed we took in the beautiful craftsmanship of the beer hall, had a quick nose at the beer garden and marvelled at the perfect choreography if the waitresses. Back on the street, we chanced our luck in a smaller establishment. To be honest it doesn’t matter where you sample the glorious beer, because it’s all good. We found a much smaller, quieter place than the Hofbräuhaus but had as much fun. We ordered our stein’s, sat back, drank and discussed our plans for the next day…perfection.

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Munich Residenz

Firstly ladies, be prepared to check your bag into storage or bring a smaller handbag with you if you want to visit the Residenz. This caught me slightly unawares and whilst I have no issue with checking my bag into secure storage to avoid knocking any priceless antiques; I wasn’t prepared for this level of security. Cue ten minutes of me faffing, talking to myself and desperately going through my bag to remove anything I thought necessary whilst walking around. This included my phone, purse, lip balm and an array of other pointless objects, but I could fit them in my pocket so naturally, they had to come to. So, you have been forewarned!

The Residenz served as the seat of government for the Bavarian kings, dukes and electors from 1508 to 1918. It is stunning. An opulent display of wealth, architecture, style and art are displayed in every room of the Residenz. It is a feast for your eyes and will take a good three hours to absorb it all.

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My favourite section of the Residenz was the grotto courtyard. A slightly bizarre, quirky, shell clad indoor folly. I loved it.

There are five different types of ticket you can buy for the Residenz depending on the areas you wish to see. We opted for a combination ticket costing €17 which allowed us access to the Residenz, Treasury and Cuvillies Theatre. The Residenz is open year-round from 9 am to 6 pm during the spring and summer months and from 10 am to 5 pm during the autumn and winter.

The Glockenspiel on Marienplatz

Marienplatz is the heart of Munich and has been at the centre of Munich life for over 850 years. The history, distinctive architecture and style of the square have enough going on to keep you occupied for hours.

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One of the prime attractions on Marienplatz is the Rathaus Glockenspiel. The glockenspiel chimes twice each day, at 11 am and 12 pm with an extra performance at 5 pm during the summer months.

The glockenspiel represents two different stories. On the top layer, a royal wedding and jousting tournament and on the bottom a folk dance performed by the red-coated city’s Coopers.

To this clockwork spectacle, I would recommend grabbing your spot early. As 11 am draws near the square is crammed full of expectant tourists, cameras poised. The whole event lasts fifteen minutes and is well worth the crowds to hear the forty-three bells combined with the magnificent figures.

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For a bird’s eye view of the glockenspiel head to the upper floors of the Hugendubel book shop just across the street.

The Englischer Garten

On our final day, we had just a few hours to kill before heading back to the airport, so we decided to take a stroll through the Englischer Garten. The Englischer Garten was beautiful and full of spring flowers, wide-open spaces to catch some spring sunshine, tucked away follies and meandering paths dappled in shade. One of the highlights of the garden is the river which runs right through it. If you visit during the summer months, you can expect to see avid surfers, surfing the river. Yes, that’s right the river creates waves good enough for surfing! If you are visiting during the summer months, I recommend bringing a towel and swimsuit as sections of the river looked perfect for a quick cooling dip.

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Summer time surfing! Images: Alistair McRobert & Luis Fernando Alves 

 

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Finally, after an ice-cream and a very leisurely stroll, the Englischer Garten provided the perfect spot for one last beverage. The Englischer Garten hosts Munich’s second-largest but oldest beer garden right next to the Chinese Tower.

As one of Europe’s largest city parks, it is definitely worth an hour or two to lose yourself in its natural glory.

Pinakothek Der Moderne

I’m not sure where my love and appreciation of modern art have come from, but a visit to a city’s museum of modern art seems to be a fairly permanent feature on my weekend travels.

The museum houses four different collections under one roof. A single ticket allows visitors to access artwork, architecture, design and work on paper. The artwork on display is from 1900 onwards and picks up where the Neue Pinakothek ends. I particularly enjoyed the surrealist and cubist work of Dali and Picasso.

The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday with adult entry costing €10. If you have an hour to two and enjoy modern art then I would suggest a visit to the Pinakothek Der Moderne is well worth it.

Dachau Concentration Camp

Visiting a concentration camp isn’t an easy or fun day trip, however, nor is it just a tick in the tourist box. I have long held the view that we have a moral responsibility to educate ourselves, respect and remember the millions of people who suffered under the Nazi regime during World War Two. With that in mind, a visit to Dachau was an absolute priority for our trip to Munich.

Dachau is located just outside the city and easily accessed by train in twenty-five minutes. The S2 train from the Hauptbahnhof will take you to Dachau station. The memorial is open year-round 8 am – 5 pm excluding the 24th of December and entry is free. If you do wish, there are audio guides, guided tours and brochures which can be organised through the information centre or online prior to your visit.

We decided to visit early on a Sunday morning, taking the view that it might be a little quieter. As we arrived it was as though we stepped into a vacuum. The whole place felt thick and heavy with silence. As you cross the road from the visitor centre, you follow train tracks through the gates, the gates which bare the infamous ‘Arbeit Macht Frei.’ From that point onwards I don’t think I spoke to my husband for the next two hours as we made our way around the site and exhibitions. It wasn’t until we sat down to dinner that evening, took stock and debriefed each other on our feelings from the day.

The sheer scale of the site was shocking, row upon row of hollowed out, gravelled rectangles, the outlines an echo of barracks long since torn down. Gas chambers, empty buildings harbouring absolute horror in every inch of its structure. It was difficult to reconcile what I knew to be true with these empty shells, with sunlight streaming through empty windows and bird song carried on the breeze.

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Whilst our visit was emotionally draining and a uniquely personal experience for us both in different ways. I can say with conviction that it was worth it and something every traveller to Munich must do.

Final Thoughts

Our trip to Munich was fabulous and almost unexpectedly so. I loved learning about the history of the city, both recent and long since passed. Like so many of our weekend adventures, I left feeling that there was more to do and see. I am sure a return visit to Munich will be on cards at some point. If I can tear myself away from roasted pork knuckle then I would be keen to explore what the Munich foodie scene has to offer. There is also the small matter of a day trip to Neuschwanstein Castle to consider as well!

Happy travels

Jess

 

Germany, History, mini break, top tips, Uncategorized, weekend break

48 hours in Berlin: A weekend guide to the German capital

When my husband and I decided to embark on our honeymoon trip extravaganza (One trip every month for a year) Berlin was right at the top of our list. Each time we would sit down to plan our next destination, we would weigh up our options and strangely Berlin never quite made the cut. But come Boxing Day 2019 we found a brilliant flight and hotel deal with British Airways and booked up a weekend trip for the end of January.

Ok, so January isn’t the most desirable time to visit any city. But 48 hours of relentless rain and bitter temperatures didn’t dampen our sense of adventure and we set out to take in as much of the city as possible.

Berlin is nothing like I expected. In my mind, I would stroll down wide imposing streets, flanked on either side by a lustrous mix of Neoclassical, Art Nouveau, Gothic and Renaissance buildings. Such as I had experienced in Prague, Stockholm or even Munich. My expectation could not have been further from the truth. I guess I thought more of the city would have survived the bombing raids of World War Two or would have been repaired and reinstated post-war. Berlin is a city which wears its history on its sleeve. The startling lack of historic buildings is a testament to the hardships faced by the city during the relentless bombing campaigns of the Second World War. Present-day Berlin is a concrete jungle. It’s not a European beauty. Yet, despite a limited stock of pre-war buildings and monuments the layers and depth of history secreted into every remaining and reimagined crevice of the city more than make up for any architectural shortcomings.

Getting to Berlin

Flights to Berlin Tegel airport operate regularly out of all major UK airports. The flight time is around 1 hour and 45 minutes. More than doable of a Friday night for a weekend break. Our flight left London Heathrow at 7 pm, and we were on the ground and on our way to the hotel by 10 pm. Berlin is 1 hour ahead of the UK. The time difference is worth bearing in mind if you are booking transfers or informing your hotel of your arrival time.

We opted for a taxi straight from the airport which was efficient and reasonably priced at around €35. The taxi ride took a little over half an hour as there were some pretty major road works going on in the centre of Berlin. If you’re after a cheaper alternative airport transfer, then public transport options are in plentiful supply. The TXL bus, S41 finally changing to the U8 will get you from the airport to Alexanderplatz in around thirty minutes.

Where to stay

Hotel location is always a priority when travelling for just the weekend. We wanted to be close enough to walk to the main attractions, hence, we opted for the Hotel Indigo at Alexanderplatz.

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The hotel was clean, quirky and perfectly located for a weekend gallivanting around the city in the rain. Read my full Hotel Indigo review here https://takemefarandaway.com/2020/02/20/hotel-review-4-hotel-indigo-alexanderplatz-berlin/

Where to eat

Café Einstein Unter Den Linden

This was an absolute gem. On our final day, we dashed in to escape the rain and found IMG_0836ourselves stepping back in time. Dark wood panelling, marble-topped tables and a charming feel of an old Viennese coffee house. There was also an eye-watering display of cakes and pastries. After securing a table, we ordered a proper lunch 2 bowls of gloriously rich, thick goulash complete with crispy yet gooey dumplings to soak up all those fabulous juices. I couldn’t resist a slice of passionfruit cheesecake to finish off – it felt rude not to indulge.

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The café serves up breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner and is a real hot spot for German politicians and journalists. With only a short five-minute walk to the Brandenburg Gate or a ten-minute walk to the Reichstag, it’s no wonder Café Einstein has famed popularity with tourists and locals alike.

 

 

Treffpunkt Berlin

If you’re after traditional German food, done well with no frills and good beer then, Treffpunk should be on your list. From the outside, it looks like a distinctly average pub, but don’t let first appearances put you off. Inside there’s a small bar area and around twelve tables for diners. It was pretty busy when we arrived without a booking at 7.30 pm, but we were lucky and snagged a table right by the bar.

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After sampling the delights of pork knuckle in Munich we both opted for this again. The dish came with boiled potatoes and sauerkraut. But, unlike the knuckled served in Munich which was crispy and covered in onion, this was pure unadulterated boiled pork knuckle. The dish isn’t winning any Michelin stars but it sure was tasty. Nothing partners meat and potato better than beer and you’d be pretty safe ordering any beer from the extensive menu. I went for the Schöfferhofer Grapefruit beer which was delicious, very easy to have one too many of these!

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Currywurst

Ok, so this isn’t a specific location but currywurst should absolutely be on our Berlin food buck list. Currywurst is a fried pork sausage smothered in thick spiced ketchup, topped with curry powder and a side helping of chips. This is German fast food at it’s best. To get our currywurst fix we went for a mooch in the behemoth shopping mall. What started out as a roam around the shops to get out of the rain became a hunt for food. Once the food court was located there was no shortage of delicious offerings. But it had to be currywurst. I decided to embrace the opportunity to practise my very rusty German and ordered up two currywurst, chips and drink. What arrived five minutes later was exactly as planned, turns out I remember more of my GCSE German than I thought. Tray laden, we muscled our way onto a long table with ten strangers all digging into a plethora of worldwide cuisines. This multitude of sights and scents didn’t detract from the spicy pork goodness on my paper plate.

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What to do

Holocaust Memorial

Located close to the Brandenburg Gate at the heart of Berlin is the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. I had seen countless images of the memorial before my trip to Berlin but nothing prepares you for how you feel standing in front of the crude concrete slabs. Each of the 2711 slabs differs in height and as you venture through the narrow passages between you are soon engulfed by their presence. It really is quite overwhelming.

I’m unsure how I felt about the memorial if I’m honest. Whilst the scale of the 19,000 square metres stretching out before you are striking and poignant if you consider the representation of the six million Jews who lost their lives. But does this unmarked, fragmented monument really communicate the message it intended? I cannot help but think that if the names of the Jewish people who suffered were displayed as they are at Yad Vashem in Israel then, maybe a clearer narrative might unfold here. I guess we can only hope that the Instagram, selfie generation might just get a grip, pocket the phone and reflect on the real meaning of this place.

Berlin TV Tower

D2751D06-4478-4E38-838C-147163F86494Opening in 1969, complete with a revolving restaurant and panoramic viewing gallery the Berlin TV Tower was the height of sophistication and a beacon of hope for post-war Berlin. If you’d like to visit the TV Tower, you need to book in advance. This can easily be done online and with less than 12 hours’ notice, I managed to bag tickets for 10.30 on Saturday morning. Tickets cost €17.50 and can be purchased online or at the tower itself.

As you approach the tower, the scale and magnitude of it are impressive. I’m not afraid of heights but that viewing gallery looked an awfully long way up.

Be prepared that the only way up is by lift. I don’t know why this was a shock to me as 200m of stairs really would have been a killer. But I hate lifts, I’m horribly claustrophobic and the thought of ascending 200m in the air inside a concrete tube was daunting. Also, the stewards were clearly aiming to get as many people into the lift as possible. Nerves aside the views from the top are spectacular. 360-degree panoramic sights of the city spread out for miles are quite something.

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Our ticket included access to the bar where we enjoyed mid-morning coffee feeling like we were on top of the world.

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror is a must when visiting Berlin. Between 1933 and 1945, the central institutions of Nazi persecution, the Secret State Police Office, the leadership of the SS and, the Reich Security Main Office are located in the grounds of the “Topography of Terror.” The museum is completely free although you can make a donation. The museum houses two permanent exhibitions one indoor and one outdoor there are also a variety of changeable exhibitions.

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We arrived mid-morning on Saturday, the place was heaving with tourists but absolutely silent, it was like walking into a vacuum. My husband and I quickly found ourselves on our own path through the exhibition. The exhibition tracks the institutions of security and police during the Third Reich and the crimes they committed. The exhibition was overwhelming, deeply moving and explicitly detailed. I was appalled by the photographic evidence of the crimes inflicted on innocent citizens. But you cannot shy away from history. It was understandable why the museum was silent. Everyone was completely engrossed in their own personal battle and reflection on the information before them.Snapseed - Copy (19)

It was an odd thing to vacate the building, still in silence, it was like my husband and I didn’t quite know what to say to each other. Outside you can take in the remains of the original building and a section of the Berlin wall. The outdoor exhibition takes you through fifteen stations documenting the history of the original site.

German Spy Museum

Late on Saturday afternoon, I got to unleash my inner 007 with a trip to the German Spy Museum. In short, I loved it. IMG_0774The museum gives a unique glimpse into the veiled world of espionage; following the evolution of the spy right the way from biblical times to the spies we know and love from the world of film. The museum is interactive, well laid out and brimming with quirky information. There was even a laser maze, which was an absolute highlight of the visit, I felt like Catherine Zeta-Jones in Entrapment however with none of the distinctive style. Sadly, I think my laser maze skills need some work…

Tickets cost €12 and I would allow yourself a good couple of hours to explore. The museum is conveniently located close to the Berlin Mall just of Leipziger Platz. Get your tickets online to save time:

https://www.deutsches-spionagemuseum.de/en/tickets/online-tickets/

DDR Museum

I love an interactive museum, and the DDR museum certainly delivers an immersive 75AFC6DE-679D-4C2E-9F7A-36C2FBDC0BF9slice of what life was like in East Germany. The museum covers all aspects of life for the average East German from what they drove to how they used their leisure time. A really informative and valuable insight into the past. I would recommend visiting later in the afternoon as it was very busy when arrived early afternoon on a Sunday. Buy your tickets here:

https://www.ddr-museum.de/en/your-visit/online-tickets

East Side Gallery

1.3km of history turned art gallery. Following the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, 118 artists from across the world began creating political, social and culturally inspired artwork on the wall. The open-air gallery officially opened in 1990 and has been given protected memorial status. The wall continues undergoing renovation and clean up projects to protect and restore the work. The restoration is critical as the majority of the work has been graffitied, or chipped away by trophy hunters keen for their own litter piece of history.

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The East Side Gallery is easily accessed by bus and is the third stop on the blue route with the Big Bus tour. Alternatively, you can take the 300 bus or the U Bahn to Warschauer street which is a short walk from the gallery.

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I would recommend getting to the East Side Gallery as early as you can. If you want to snap the artwork without having to wait or turn or carefully crop out other tourists, then an early start is well worth it. We arrived at 10.00 am on a Sunday morning and by 10.30 am the crowds had already gathered around the Socialist fraternal kiss image. An absolute must for your weekend in Berlin, I would leave yourself at least an hour to two hours to explore the gallery in full.

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Brandenburg Gate

No trip to Berlin is complete without a visit to the infamous Brandenburg Gate. It is one of those monuments synonymous with the city itself. The Brandenburg Gate which once divided the city quickly became a monument for unity when the Berlin wall fell in 1989. Visiting the Brandenburg gate is recommended at any time however I found that visiting at night when the daytime crowds had dispersed was extremely impressive.

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Reichstag

Another key monument to visit during your trip to Berlin is the Reichstag.

If you want to tour the Reichstag and its beautiful glass dome then you’ll need to book in advance. To register for your visit please follow the link: https://visite.bundestag.de/BAPWeb/pages/createBookingRequest/viewBasicInformation.jsf?lang=en

Sadly, I didn’t get my butt in gear early enough to secure a spot for the weekend of our visit. It is possible to try and book onto the same day tour at the service centre next to the Berlin Pavilion. However, if you choose to risk it on the day then you may end up queueing for some time at the service centre, sacrificing valuable time exploring the city.

Bus Tour

As I’ve already mentioned our trip was plagued by rain and lots of it. Complete with a moany husband due to a hole in his shoe it was time to board a bus tour! Luckily our hotel was situated right outside the first stop for both the red and blue routes on the Big Bus Tour. We bought a weekend ticket for €30.50 which proved to be a good investment. Initially setting out on the red route our bus came complete with a live guide providing us with a historical and social commentary from the front. The live guide made a real difference to our orientation of the city. Also, his anecdotes and vast knowledge of the city aided us to uncover a little more of the ‘real’ Berlin.

Over the weekend we followed both bus routes in their entirety and developed a good sense of the city. A welcome respite from the rain and education at the same time, what’s not to love about a bus tour?

Final thoughts

In spite of the biblical downpours which accompanied nearly every moment of our trip to Berlin, I had a brilliant weekend. Berlin was nothing like I expected but as I boarded the plane home I was left wanting more. There is so much of this historic city yet to discover and so many factions of its history that I am keen to learn about. This 48-hour trip was a tantalising glimpse at a city which is so much more than the infamous wall, it’s wartime destruction or the seat of power for the Nazi party. Modern Berlin is characterised by art, food, culture, and an outward-facing acceptance of it’s past. I’ve got my eye on a food tour and an art tour, complete with DIY graffiti for my return visit.

Happy travels

Jess

Dubrovnik, mini break, Mostar, top tips, Uncategorized

Dubrovnik: How to devote 4 days to adventure on the Croatian coast

Getting to Dubrovnik

Flights to Dubrovnik operate daily from London Gatwick with British Airways. Flight time to Dubrovnik is around two hours and thirty minutes, making it a perfectly suitable option for a short break. We took an early morning flight and had landed and checked into the hotel by 9.30 am.

Thanks to our hotel, the Scalini Palace, transfers to the city were provided for a small fee. Being greeted at the airport by our own driver made the beginning of our trip wonderfully easy. Transfer from the airport to Dubrovnik Old Town took around thirty minutes.

Where to stay

Before arranging our trip to Dubrovnik, I’d heard how difficult it was to find good accommodation in the old town. Friends had advised me to find somewhere cheap outside of the city walls. Absolutely, accommodation in the old town is limited but, it can be discovered! I stumbled on the absolute gem that is the Scalini Palace. Located on just down a narrow snicket from the Buža Gate you find the Scalini palace. It’s nestled amongst shops, bars and restaurants so, you’ll need your eyes peeled, it’s easy to stroll past. Trying to find the entrance to the correct street after dinner on our first night was like trying to find the entrance to Diagon Alley. IMG_0016

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Despite our early arrival, the hotel was extremely happy to hold onto our bags allowing us to pootle off and check in later. The hotel is quirky in that it provides lovely self-contained rooms with the option to self-cater. There is no restaurant but the Scalini Palace does provide breakfast each morning, delivered to your room.

Our room was well appointed with a double bed, sitting room area, kitchen facilities and a bright clean bathroom. One of the loveliest parts was our little balcony, equipped with table and chairs. There is something quite soothing about sitting contentedly with the morning sun on your face with a peppermint brew.

Where to eat

The Croatian culinary landscape is a real mish-mash of tastes, flavours and traditions from its neighbouring countries. Traditional Croatian cuisine has also been shaped by the varied nations and empires that have ruled the Dalmatian coastline.

With such a broad and varied selection of food on offer, we were definitely spoilt for choice.

We arrived in the city mid-morning, so we quickly located a lovely bar area looking out to the sea where we indulged in a beer and a coffee. The bar was just a short walk downhill from the Revelin Fortress and the Ploče gate.

Gradska Kavana Arsenal

We ended up returning to this prominent restaurant in the old town. The imposing façade of the historic arsenal makes it hard to miss coupled with a long dark stone passage I was utterly beguiled and hungry in comparable measure.

The passage spits you out at the dining area but if you walk through you encounter the IMG_0018loveliest outdoor courtyard area overlooking the old city port. This idyllic vista made for the perfect lunch spot. The food was reasonably priced and the service efficient. Whilst this isn’t the spot for you if you’re after an authentic Croatian restaurant, the one where the locals eat, as it is particularly popular with tourists. That being said when you’ve left freezing cold blighty that morning it’s hard to turn down a seafront table with old city port and fortress views.

At the front of the restaurant is a terrace on the main square. The terrace proved to be the ideal spot on our final evening for a few glasses of Croatian wine.

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Proto

IMG_0076The most beautiful mash potato I have ever seen. Potato wizardry aside, Proto was a slightly more luxurious choice for dinner. However, it was our first night and the food and service were excellent. We were positioned at a beautiful table on the upper terrace overlooking the streets below. I imagine this place is heaving during the summer months. I would absolutely recommend prior booking if you are visiting during this time.

It goes without saying, but the menu was heavily devoted to fish and the bounty of the sea. We both ordered different fish dishes and both were perfectly cooked and beautifully presented.

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If you are looking for a dinner reservation that’s a little bit special then I would absolutely recommend Proto, the mango mojito is rather good too.

Bota Sushi and Oyster Bar

After a long day’s excursion to Mostar, we arrived back in the Old town around 8 pm. We wanted to something quick, easy and tasty. After significantly indulging in the delight that is Ćevapi in Mostar we didn’t require anything too substantial. So, when the Bota Sushi bar fell into tracks just around the corner from the cathedral it was an inspired choice. The sushi was spectacular, locally caught gorgeously presented and I could easily have ordered our entire meal twice. Whilst we bagged a table, no problem, again I feel that booking would be recommended if you are visiting during the summer months. Top tip – the salmon skin roll and the tiger roll were sushi perfection.

Taj Mahal

Meat. Meat. Meat. The Taj Mahal isn’t one for you if you’re a veggie. This quaint little backstreet eatery offers up a selection of beautifully cooked Bosnian dishes. With five or six tables inside and another eights or side on the cobbled street, our meal felt casual and intimate.

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We were left invigorated after our trip to Mostar that we thought we’d give it a try. And I’m sure glad we did. I went for a kebab and flatbread number whilst my husband opted for a no-nonsense lamb kebab and baked potato. Both were delicious and the service was so friendly and efficient.

What to do

The City Walls

Dubrovnik old town is surrounded by 1940 metres of the historic city wall and punctuated by six spectacular fortresses (Revelin, St John, St Lucas, Bokar, Minčeta, Lovrijenac). The views from the city walls are just fabulous, and I thoroughly recommend this being at the top of your list for your first day.

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Entry to the walls cost 200kn; your ticket should last all day, so you’re free to go up and come down as much as you like. I would, however, recommend doing the full circuit at once. I found that taking our time to walk the whole walls gave us a much more coherent sense of the city and helped with orientation.

Just a few things to note, if you are visiting between April and October it’s going to be hot, particularly throughout July and August. Take plenty of water with you. There isn’t any place to stop for refreshments whilst you are on the walls so, be prepared and stay hydrated.

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Finally, footwear, I’m an avid fan of flip flops being the ultimate footwear choice for most activities however the walls are old and uneven. If I was being clever, I might have donned my trainers rather than flip flops.

Day trip to Mostar

After seeing that a day trip to the historic city of Mostar was an option, I set about IMG_0120booking an excursion for our second day. Mostar is located around fifty miles from Dubrovnik and is a two-and-a-half-hour direct drive. Bosnia and Herzegovina is not currently in the European Union, as such your passport is essential on this trip.

I discovered the perfect trip operated by Laus travel which included a visit to the Kravice waterfalls then, on to Mostar. To read about our day trip in more detail check out my post below.

https://takemefarandaway.com/2019/11/02/dubrovnik-to-mostar-a-1-day-itinerary-from-the-croatian-coast/

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The Blue Cave

Although we didn’t visit during the summer months the weather was still gorgeous. So, I thought nothing of booking up a days’ boat trip to the Blue Cave and Sunj Beach. The sea was a little bracing but still warm enough for a dip.

We met our little group of four others and Captain Joseph at the harbour and set sail. Our first stop was the gloriously secluded beach in Sunj Bay on the island of Lopud. Now, I am under no illusion that this slice of white sandy heaven was only deserted due to the time of year we visited. Rocking up mid-morning at the end of October guarantees you free run of the beach and bar area. I am certain this is a vastly different story in the height of summer. The beach is connected to the other side of the island via golf buggy. The buggies run regularly from the beach bar and the trip takes about 10mintues. It is a pleasant twenty-minute walk too if you don’t mind the hilly parts and slightly rough and ready terrain.

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The other side of the island is utterly charming. One long street butts up against the sea, fishing boats gently bobbing in the blue. The scene which greets you is like something out of The Durrells, there is even a 15th-century monastery at the far-right end of the main street. This first stop on our trip was so relaxing I could easily have spent all day pottering around Lopud and paddling in the tepid waters of Sunj Bay.

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Once back on the boat we headed for the main attraction…caves. As the boat skirted round the coastline, I was speechless, the towering cliffs had been carved out by the water into so many intricate and captivating formations. The uppermost parts of cliffs were covered with trees and shrubs, and the whole scene was just filled with bird song. At the first set of caves, Captain Joseph gave us a quick snorkelling what’s what then we flippered up and headed for the water. At the end of October, there is only one way to enter those crystalline waters, jump.

Once accustomed to the water we headed for the biggest of the three caves. The further in you swam the colder and darker it got. Although it was the biggest there was only Snapseed - Copy (16)room at the very back for one or two of us. If you’re feeling particularly, brave the cave at the end of the trio is for you. There is the option to swim to the back, under the rock, into an antechamber brings you out the other side of the cliff. I am unashamed to say this was one step too far for my level of bravery. The thought of having to swim, even briefly under the rock fills me with absolute dread. Also, I’ve seen the film The Decent one too many times…Who knows what’s lurking down in the belly of a cave system. However, despite my disappointing lack of courage, I thoroughly enjoyed the snorkelling at the mouth of the three caves. There were so many gorgeous, alluring fish and technicolour starfish who were totally unperturbed by my less than graceful splashing about.

Last stop was the absolute highlight of the trip, and Captain Joseph did a fabulous job of hyping it up, the blue cave. As we puttered along the coastline, we were all silently scouring the cliffs to see if we could pick out which opening would be the elusive gateway. When Captain Joseph declared that we were there it is safe to say we were all a little perplexed. The bay we had come into showed absolutely no sign of any caves and the cliff faces were unmarked and remarkably crevasse free. Or so we thought, to our untrained eyes we hadn’t spotted the tiny slither of darkness at the bottom of one of the cliffs. The Blue Cave looks like every other cave we’d swum into not fifteen minutes earlier. But its true glory came upon reaching the back wall and turning around. The entire cathedral-like space was bathed in a luminescent azure glow. This phenomenon is caused by the reflection of sunlight through the opening of the cave off the white sandy floor.

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That little gap at the bottom…yep, that’s the entrance to the Blue Cave!

The whole day was absolutely fabulous, and Captain Joseph made the trip. He was knowledgeable, well organised and had a cracking sense of humour. If you are looking to book this trip, we booked the trip through Trip Advisor, the Blue Cave by Dubrovnik Island Tours. Tours cost £51 per person, and it is worth every penny.

Srd Hill Cable Car

This is a must-do. Make a plan to head up the mountain just before sunset because the view of the sun setting over the ocean and the old town is like nothing else. Once hidden the sun burns through the cloud leaving dappled streaks of pink and orange. The multi-coloured ombre perfectly reflected in the water was the most beautiful end to our trip.

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The cable car costs 170kn for an adult round trip or 90kn for one way. There is a path which you can walk down the mountain if you would prefer stretching your legs. We went for the round trip due to timing our visit at sunset there wouldn’t have been enough daylight to take the path down. I didn’t fancy getting stuck on a dark path halfway up a mountain.

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The cable car operates eleven months of the year but is closed throughout the month of February. The last departure from the lower station is thirty minutes before closing. Closing time varies throughout the year from 4 pm during December and January to midnight in the summer months.

If you fancy taking in more than the view, I can recommend snagging a window table or table on the terrace at the Panorama Restaurant and Bar.

 

 

Franciscan Pharmacy

Just before the mighty Pile Gate is a Franciscan Monastery complete with arguable the oldest pharmacy in Europe. Initially built to serve the needs of the Friars it rapidly grew to service the needs of the town and wider population.IMG_0240

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If you have a spare half an hour then I would recommend a visit. The pretty cloistered monastery garden is wonderfully peaceful. At 9.15 am there was an all-consuming quiet which seemed to wrap around and cocoon you. The old pharmacy museum is also open every day from 9 am to 6 pm.

Red History Museum

IMG_0248On our last morning, we breakfasted early and set off for the Red History Museum. The museum presents Croatia’s modern history and what life was like for ordinary people under the Communist regime of Yugoslavia. The more we travel through countries who were occupied by the Soviet Union or experienced socialist movements and communism, the more I am fascinated by these points in history.

The Red History Museum was around a thirty-five to forty-minute walk from the old town. Entry to the museum costs 50hkr and the museum is open from 9.30 am to 10 pm from April to October. If you are travelling during the winter months opening hours do vary.

The exhibition was exceptionally well presented and really hands-on. I am a total child when it comes to museums, I love nothing more than to be able to practically engage in some way with the information being presented. The Red History Museum did not disappoint, learning about the Communist regime in Yugoslavia, its subsequent disintegration and how it affected the lives of normal people was fascinating.

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Final thoughts

Our four days in Dubrovnik was the perfect mix of adventure and time to chill. I am so pleased that we opted for the two days trips away from the city. However, I do feel as though more time is needed to really get under the surface of this magnificent city. I reckon a return visit would see Dubrovnik as a stop on a more multi-centred trip of Croatia and its fabulous islands. One of the best things about our trip was definitely our choice to visit at the end of October. The crowds were diminished, and we got into some of the best restaurants without any prior booking. The weather was still glorious, and the sea was warm enough for an invigorating swim. If you can visit outside of July and August then I would urge you to get booking.

Happy travels

Jess

avios, top tips, Uncategorized

Making travel more affordable: 6 Top Tips for earning Avios points

Avios points have, for me become a bit of salvation and a slight preoccupation. On long rainy days when I’m stressed out with work and desperately need something to look forward to; there is nothing more satisfying than realising a sneaky warm weekend break will only cost me a fraction of the price due to my Avios squirrelling.

Here a few top tips for earning these fabulous little travel nuggets which might help you maximise your collecting potential and help you get that next trip booked.

Flights

Interestingly flights are not the most lucrative source of Avios collection for me, 529F1DA7-8839-4AC4-966D-9A568CF88BA6.JPGhowever, they are of course a great way to collect points. Flights additionally offer you Tier points which are important for members of the BA Executive Club to help you move through the loyalty tiers. Each loyalty tier offers its own perks whether that’s access to the lounge or priority boarding. Regular flights are the key to keeping your loyalty tier. I have even been tempted to book a flight simply to bag the all important tier points.

Avois points can also be collected from flights taken with airlines in the One World Alliance. Carriers like Cathay Pacific, Iberia, American Airlines and Quantas to name a few allow you to find the most suitable flight whilst keeping your Avios points rolling in.

For more information on how many Avios points, tier points or tier bonuses are available with the One World Alliance airlines check out BA’s page https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/executive-club/collecting-avios/flights

Hotels

British Airways has an extensive range of hotel partners who you can collect Avios with without having to be a member of their specific reward schemes. Their partners include Airbnb, Shangri La Hotels & Resorts, Booking.com and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group amongst others. Earning Avios through hotels has lots of potential and is definitely one option I need to exploit further.

For more information how you can convert your hotel points to Avios the BA website offers a comprehensive guide https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/executive-club/collecting-avios/hotels/convert-your-points

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Holidays

This source of Avios income is definitely one of my favourites. I can often be found, mostly on a Sunday afternoon; because no one wants to think about work on Monday morning busily scrolling through the BA Holiday Finder. With 1 Avios point available for every £1 spent the BA package deals can be a good option for collecting points.

Tallinn 1

BA holidays are an easy go-to when I’ve been looking for weekend city breaks. With hotel and flight included in the price, I am free to focus my efforts on planning the activities rather than trying to sort flight and hotel logistics. Check out the BA Holiday Finder here https://www.britishairways.com/travel/holiday-finder/public/en_gb

Credit Card

By far and away the BA American Express Card is for me, one of the best ways to earn Avios points. I am not really a credit card person however we invested in the BA American Express card at a time when we were renovating our house and paying for a wedding. Naturally, neither of those things come cheaply and we had some large outgoings. With this in mind, we thought to earn Avios through our payments was a win-win.

We opted for the BA American Express Premium Plus card. This offers 25,000 Avios as a 5B5BC3CE-BB14-4BE5-963D-0B83D6F2B282.JPGwelcome providing you spend £3,000 in the first three months. The card has an annual charge of £195. However, for every £1 spend you get 1.5 Avios and with every £1 spent on BA flight and holidays you get an additional 3 Avios. We have absolutely identified this as a brilliantly easy way to earn Avios to fund our itch to travel.

One of the biggest perks has been the BA Companion Voucher. A 2 for 1 travel voucher award when you spend £10,000 with your BA American Express card. The voucher entitles you to a second seat on the same flight and class as another person. Taxes, fees and charges still apply, but you do make a great saving. We have just booked up a return business class trip to Croatia with our Companion Voucher for a mere £80. With another voucher in the stocks, I’m already eyeing up something a little more long haul!

If you are in a position to pay the annual fee and pay the balance of your credit card monthly then this is an excellent option. To find out more about the BA American Express please see their website https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/executive-club/collecting-avios/credit-cards/uk

Shopping

1F45F6FF-ECE6-4141-8A06-D1E160F24AC6.JPGThis option is fantastic. If you’re an online shopper, you can connect with your favourite brands via the Avios EStore where you can shop over 800 brands as you normally would. You can collect up to 30 Avios for every £1 however there are always deals and offers. As of August 2019, you can snap up 10 Avios for every pound with Selfridges & Co or 4 Avios per pound with John Lewis. You’ll be surprised how quickly the points can accumulate…maybe try this one out with some of your online Christmas gift shopping?

Fuel

From June 2019 there were some changes to how you can collect Avios when purchasing fuel. However, you can still cash in the Avios with fuel purchases at Tesco, if you have a Tesco Clubcard. Scan your Clubcard to receive 600 Avios for every £2.50 in Clubcard vouchers which you then exchange to Avios. A genuinely good option if you are a Tesco shopper and are already a Clubcard holder.

Happy travels,

Jess